An airplane wing with land visible beneath a golden sky, which is what the LGBT Irish diaspora might be seeing soon if they decide to leave America

4 LGBT Friendly Countries The Irish Diaspora In The US Need To Consider Now

Planning on leaving the US after Trump’s election to President? Check out these other LGBT friendly countries that the Irish diaspora could relocate to

 

Ok, so Trump’s won the US Presidential election which means that Mike Pence will also be rising to power as the next Vice President, a man who is a proponent in conversion therapy.

But what does that mean for the our brethren living in the US? Well for starters if you’re Irish, LGBT and living in the US it might be time to reconsider your living circumstances.

The LGBT Irish diaspora might consider moving to a country that is, shall we say, more LGBT friendly and does not have a racist and misogynist for a President.

So we’ve compiled a list of countries that are LGBT friendly which our diaspora can look into.

 

1. Ireland

Dublin's river Liffey and Samuel Beckett bridge, indicative of Ireland one of the lgbt friendly places that the irish diaspora can return to

First up is Ireland. That’s right. If you haven’t considered it already, returning to Ireland might not be that crazy an idea.

Sure we could do with improvements like hate-crime legislation, initiatives to prevent homophobic bullying in schools and education to reduce homophobia across the nation, but we did legalise marriage equality by popular vote last year, and the Gender Recognition Act 2015 is leading the way for trans rights across the world.

Ireland is – legislatively speaking, at the very least – quite LGBT friendly. Plus we’ve got Barry’s tea, real chocolate, chicken fillet rolls, Mammy’s cooking… the list could go on!

 

2. Canada

The night skyline of Toronto, Canada which is one of the lgbt friendly places that the irish diaspora can travel to instead of the US

Ok, so you don’t want to cross the Atlantic ever again? Fair enough. Then you should consider emigrating to Canada, the US’ friendly neighbour to the north.

With same-sex sexual activity decriminalised in Canada in 1969, and same-sex marriage legalised in 2005, they’re one of the world’s trailblazers in the provision of LGBT rights.

On top of that they’re English speaking (for the most part), known for their friendliness and have some really gorgeous weather in the summer!

Not bad, eh?

 

3. Spain

Madrid Pride in Spain, one of the LGBT friendly countries the Irish diaspora could relocate to

If the balmy climate of Spain isn’t enough to entice the Irish diaspora, then perhaps their stance on LGBT rights will be.

In 2005 Spain became the third country in the world to legalise same-sex marriage, as well as allowing LGBT people to serve openly in the military in the same year.

Sitges is widely considered a gay mecca while Madrid’s Pride is one of the biggest LGBT festivals in the world.

If non-Spanish speaking members of the Irish diaspora can get over the fact that they’d have to learn another language and their mid-afternoon siesta, then Spain is a strong contender.

The cheap flights to the motherland and throughout Europe along with a very liberal attitude towards LGBT people make Spain even more attractive.

 

4. The Netherlands

A windmill near a body of water in the Netherlands, which is one of the countries the lgbt Irish diaspora might relocate to

With same-sex sexual activity being legalised in 1811, The Netherlands is heralded as progressive when it comes to LGBT rights. Homosexuality was no longer classified as a mental illness in The Netherlands in 1973 and The Netherlands became the first country to legalise same-sex marriage in 2001.

Recent polls indicate that 90% of Dutch people support same-sex marriage, meaning that homophobia is less likely to be encountered compared to Ireland for instance.

Amsterdam has also been named one of the most LGBT friendly cities in the world and same-sex adoption was legalised in 2001 throughout the country meaning that starting a family as an LGBT couple is possible.

 

Images: (By Daniel Dudektedeytan [CC BY-SA 2.0])

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